37mm Gun Motor Carriage M61-5

M6: General
Date of first acceptance April 1942 Total acceptances 5380
Manufacturer Fargo Motor Corporation Crew
4 men:
  • Commander
  • Gunner
  • Loader
  • Driver
M6: Dimensions
Combat weight 7350lbs
3334kg
Height 82.75"
210.2cm
Length 178"
452cm
Width 88"
224cm
Tread 64.75"
164.5cm
Wheelbase 98"
249cm
Ground clearance 10.63"
27.00cm
M6: Armament
Type Mount Ammunition Traverse Elevation
37mm Gun M3 M25 or M26 on rear of vehicle 80 rounds 360°
(manual)
+15°to -10°
(manual)
M6: Armor
Gun shield .25"
.64cm
M6: Automotive
Engine Dodge T-214; 6 cylinder, 4 cycle, in-line gasoline
Horsepower Net: 99@3300rpm Torque Net: 184 ft-lb@1400rpm Fuel capacity 30gal
110L
Transmission Selective sliding gear, 4 speeds forward, 1 reverse
Steering Steering wheel
Brakes Hydraulic, internal expanding
M6: Suspension
Type Road wheels
Semi-elliptic leaf spring 2/side
M6: Performance
Max level road speed 55mph
89kph
Max grade 60%
Max vertical obstacle 12"
30cm
Min turning diameter 44'
13m
Max fording depth 35"
89cm
Cruising range ~180mi, roads
~290km, roads

The 37mm GMC M6 placed the 37mm gun M3 on the back of a four-wheel drive 3/4-ton truck. The weapon was intended to be fired to the rear, and the only armor on the vehicle was the gun shield. A 5000lb (2300kg) self-recovery winch was at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle was standardized as the 37mm GMC M4 on 26 December 1941, but in February 1942 the designation was changed to M6 to avoid confusion with the M4 tank. The M6 was an interim design to be used until a fully-armored carriage was designed, and all but 100 of the remaining M6s were converted back to their truck base by November 1943. The M6 was classified as limited standard in September 1943, but not declared obsolete until January 1945.

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References

  1. Hunnicutt, R.P. Armored Car: A History of American Wheeled Combat Vehicles. Navato, CA: Presidio Press, 2002. Reprinted from Armored Car, R.P. Hunnicutt ©2002, available from Presidio Press, 505B San Martin Drive, Suite 160, Navato, CA 94945.
  2. Catalogue of Standard Ordnance Items, second edition 1944, volume I: Tank and Automotive. Washington, D.C.: Office of the Chief of Ordnance, Technical Division, 1 June 1945.
  3. Crismon, Fred W. U.S. Military Wheeled Vehicles. Minneapolis: Victory Publishing, Ltd., 2001.
  4. Gill, Lonnie. Tank Destroyer Forces--WWII. Paducah, KY: Turner Publishing Co., 1992.
  5. Hogg, Ian V. The Greenhill Armoured Fighting Vehicles Data Book. London: Greenhill Books, 2000.

Last updated 14 Oct 2016.
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