Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The M16 illustrated here is ready for fire with the armor flaps hinged down on the sides and rear. The notches in the side armor to allow free rotation of the turret can also be seen. (Picture from Standard Nomenclature List G-102.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The rear door in the passenger compartment was not present, and stowage was mounted on the hull rear instead. (Picture from TM 9-710 Basic Half-Track Vehicles (White, Autocar, and Diamond T).)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The gunner's position inside the turret can be glimpsed here, as well as how much room in the passenger compartment is taken up by the turret. Ammunition chests were stowed behind the driver's seat, although none are present in this image. (Picture from Standard Nomenclature List G-102.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

Ammunition chests are stowed on this vehicle, further reducing room in the rear compartment. (Picture from TM 9-710 Basic Half-Track Vehicles (White, Autocar, and Diamond T).)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The multiple machine gun mount M45 is shown here with the armor plates in place to protect the gunner. Fully equipped, it weighed around 2,400lb (1,100kg), was 81.5" (207cm) wide overall, and 55" (140cm) tall with the guns at 0° elevation. Later-production M45s saw the addition of larger batteries (which retained the same 6-volt, 150 ampere-hours at 20-hour rate capacity); the replacement of the voltmeter with a hydrometer; a separate turret drive switch and circuit breaker, replacing the earlier combination turret drive switch and circuit breaker; and safety belts for the gunner. (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The M45 mount is seen here from the front with the guns elevated to 90°. The mount was 75" (190cm) tall in this configuration. (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

This view is looking down into the gunner's seat. (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The power drive unit is revealed when seeing the gun mount from the bottom. A. Foot. B. Guard. C. Thermostat. D. Block. F. Relay. G. Elevation gear box. H. Turret ring gear. I. Azimuth gear box. J. Azimuth interrupter switches. (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The gunner's control handles are shown in this picture. The motor over heat panel light would turn on when the motor reached 190-210°F (88-99°C). (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

To mount the machine gun in the M45 mount, it was slid backwards until the rear gun pin dropped into the horizontal slot in the horizontal adjustment block, then the gun was pushed forward until the hole in the forward end of the receiver lined up with the holes in the vertical adjustment yoke. The front gun securing pin was then twisted through the holes in the vertical adjustment yoke and gun receiver, and the gun securing pin latch was engaged to the front gun securing pin. (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

The firing solenoids were clamped onto the buffer tubes of the machine guns. Manual triggers were mounted behind the solenoids to enable the use of the guns without electrical power. Pressing on the trigger forced the solenoid core forward and fired the gun. The bell crank could be rotated away from the gun as a safety mechanism to prevent negligent discharges. (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16.

This rear view highlights the batteries and Briggs & Stratton Model 304 type 25592 power charger. The power charger was a 300-watt, 12-volt, 4-cycle gasoline engine that could be started either electrically or manually. On later-production M45 mounts, the voltmeter was replaced by a hydrometer. (Picture from TM 9-223 Twin Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M33 and Multiple Cal. .50 Machine Gun Mount M45.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16 at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

Details of the rear of the gun mount are provided here. Four two-hundred-round ammunition chests M2 fed the machine guns, and the hinged armor can be seen as well.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16 at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

With the gun mount taking up so much room in the rear, the vehicle's fuel tanks were relocated to the front of the passenger compartment. The right-side fuel tank with its filler cap on top can be glimpsed towards the front of the vehicle.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16 at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

Three seats were still provided in the driver's area. Stowage for spare ammunition chests can be seen behind the seats. From foreground to background, the floor-mounted levers are the front drive shift lever, the transfer case shift lever, the (very long) transmission shift lever, the parking brake lever (the only lever without a black knob), and the power take-off shift lever. The power take-off lever operates the winch: when pushed forward the winch reverses to unwind cable and when pulled to the rear the winch operates in forward speed to wind the cable. The vehicle's clutch was depressed before moving the power take-off lever, and when the clutch was released the winch speed was controlled by the vehicle's foot accelerator pedal.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16 at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The mounting of the front winch is shown here.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16 at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

A closeup of the later, small demountable headlight is provided in this image. A marker light is mounted above the headlight. When the headlight assembly was dismounted, a plug chained to the mounting bracket filled the resulting hole, protecting it from debris. Half-tracks manufactured by International Harvester also used demountable headlights, but the brush guard was of a different design.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16A1.

This MGMC M16A1 also illustrates features of the M3 half-track, like fenders that are thick in cross-section and bolted armor. Notice also the late, double-coil spring-loaded idler wheel. This machine lacks the folding passenger compartment armor panels found on the custom-made antiaircraft half-tracks, but the quad-machine gun turret was raised 6" (15cm) to enable the weapons to fire over the sides and rear of the half-track. The driver's armored door cover is folded down, and the armored windshield cover is elevated. The folding shields for the gun crew are readily visible, and the inner shields are folded onto each other. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16A1.

Since the M16A1 featured a rear door, stowage on the rear armor was rearranged so that it was not blocked. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16A1 at the World War II Vehicle Museum and Learning Center.

The outer sections of the "bat wing" shields on this MGMC M16A1 are folded inward and resting on the inner plates.

Home       Vehicle list       Top


Last updated 2 Oct 2021.
Questions? Comments? Corrections? Email me
© Copyright 2001-21 Chris Conners