Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M14.

The M14 shares traits with the half-track personnel carrier M5 on which it is based, including the thin fenders and demountable headlights visible on this example. The machine gun turret can be seen in the rear compartment, and the hinged side armor running the length of the top of the passenger compartment is folded down. (Picture from Tank Data, vol. 2.)

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Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M14.

The positioning of the machine gun turret in the rear can be seen here. Absent on this vehicle is the shield that normally enveloped the gunner and lower portion of the machine gun turret. Many M14s were converted into personnel carriers as World War II progressed. (Picture from TM 9-707 Basic Half-Track Vehicles (IHC).)

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Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M14.

This picture illustrates where extra .50cal ammunition chests and boxes were stowed. The Maxson turret would occupy the large white space in the rear of the passenger compartment. Some underfloor stowage compartments are open to the front of the vehicle, and the hinged armor flaps are lowered on this vehicle. Due to the curved rear corners of the passenger compartment of International Harvester half-tracks, the rear folding armor flap was mounted a few inches inboard from the rear of the vehicle. This contrasts with the MGMC M13, where the rear armor flap is directly atop the rear armor. (Picture from TM 9-707 Basic Half-Track Vehicles (IHC).)

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Last updated 1 Jul 2018.
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