90mm gun tank M48 Patton 48 at the US Army Ordnance Museum.

The commander of the M48 was provided with a conventional cupola and an external mount for his .50cal machine gun. This was replaced in production with Chrysler's M1 cupola.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48 Patton 48 at the US Army Ordnance Museum.

The drivers of M48s had a small hatch compared with later versions of the tank. This vehicle had been equipped with an infrared periscope for the driver; the IR periscope was mounted in the hatch door.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48C Patton 48.

The glacis of the M48C was marked with a prominent weld bead to prevent confusion with tanks that were armored to the correct specification. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48C Patton 48.

The top of the turret is shown here in splendid detail. Both the loader's D-shaped hatch and the early commander's cupola hatch are open. The commander was provided with four periscopes in his cupola, including the one in the hatch door. The .50cal machine gun mounting lugs can be seen on the cupola opposite the hatch door. The gunner's periscope is to the left of the TC's cupola in the image, and the turret ventilating blower cover is under the loader's hatch door. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48A1 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The large cupola, five return rollers, and rear auxiliary track tensioning wheel identify this vehicle as an M48A1 or M48A2 tank. The shock absorbers on the first two and last road wheels can be seen, and stowage boxes are present on the fenders. The turret ventilating blower cover can be seen on the top of the turret rear, just in front of the stowage basket. A mount for a water can is placed low on the turret rear. A grab rail is welded to the turret below the lifing eye. The left armored blister for the stereoscopic rangefinder is near the middle of the upper side of the turret.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48A1 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The large box in the middle of the hull rear plate housed an infantry phone. The square plates below and outboard of the phone box and the central circular plate just below the phone box were all for access to the transmission. The ventilator in the turret's left rear can be seen, and the structure of the turret basket and water can mounts on the turret sides are apparent.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48A1 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The M48 and M48A1 had their exhausts routed through the rear deck, and the exhaust outlet is visible here. The two deflectors were necessary to keep the hot exhaust gases from heating the gun travel lock (folded down on this tank), a situation which would eventually cause it to bind. The grille doors toward the rear of the tank were for transmission access, while those to either side of the exhaust provided access to the engine. The gun travel lock is folded down onto the transmission access center plate. Numerous lifting eyes are present to enable the various grilles and plates to be swung open.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48A1 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The right-side transmission and engine access grilles can be seen here. The cover next to the gun travel lock protected the engine oil filler, and there would normally be an exhaust muffler for the auxiliary engine sloping down across the engine access grille near the turret.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48A1 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The M48 and M48A1 had two gasoline-powered personnel heaters installed along the left side of the hull. The exhausts for these heaters were routed through the front hull next to the driver's hatch as seen here. The guard in front of the heater exhausts housed handles for external activation of the vehicle's fire extinguishers. Around the gun shield are mounts for a cover, and through the gun shield are protrusions for the coaxial machine gun (on the cannon's left), and the gunner's direct sight telescope on the opposite side of the main gun.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48A2C Patton 48 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This M48A2C features three track return rollers, and lacks the small track tensioning idler previously found between the last road wheel and drive sprocket. The most important changes are internal, however, and included a new coincidence rangefinder and other fire control system improvements. One of the rangefinder sights is visible on the top side of the turret.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm Gun Tank M48A2C Patton 48 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The elliptical cross-section of the tank can be seen in this view. A Y-shaped blast deflector is apparent, as are the two sighting blisters for the M17 coincidence rangefinder on the top of the turret sides. The single exhaust for the personnel heater is visible to the right of the driver's hatch, and the three periscope housings surrounding his hatch are closed. The driver's hatch itself has a mount for an infrared periscope. Just to the left of the driver's hatch is a support for when it is rotated to the open position. The large M1 commander's cupola dominates the turret's right side, and the guard for the gunner's M32 periscope is visible in front of the TC's cupola. The opening for the coaxial machine gun has been plated over on the gun shield's left side, and the larger aperture for the gunner's M97C telescope is on the other side of the 90mm gun.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm gun tank M48A2C Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The difference between the small driver's hatch in the tank above is easily contrasted with the hatch on this later model.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm Gun Tank M48A2C Patton 48 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The new exhaust grille is obvious when the vehicle is viewed from behind. The square in the right-side door is for mounting a deep-water fording exhaust stack. The vehicle's taillights are just below the exhaust grille doors, and a towing pintle is placed in the center of the lower rear plate. The two square plates and the circular plate above the towing pintle still provide access to the transmission. The ventilator is also visible on the turret's left side, and a periscope guard rises up from the commader's cupola. The housing for the infantry telephone intercom can be seen on the right fender.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm Gun Tank M48A2C Patton 48 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This tank lacks the track tensioning idler wheel found on the earlier Patton tanks. The number of track return rollers has also been reduced to three. The frame for the insulated exhaust tunnel is visible, and engine intake grilles line both sides of the exhaust tunnel. The friction snubber on the last road wheel is also apparent, just in front of the return roller.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm Gun Tank M48A3 (Mod B) Patton 48 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The commander's cupola on this tank sits atop the vision block adapter ring, giving the TC more room and a better all-around view. The exhaust for the M60-type personnel heater can be seen just in front of the fender stowage box. The aperture visible in the gun shield was for the gunner's direct-sight telescope.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





90mm Gun Tank M48A3 (Mod B) Patton 48 at the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This tank is provided with a xenon searchlight, and details of its mounting are visible here. The tubular guard in front the commander's cupola is to prevent the TC from machine gunning the searchlight. The gunner's periscope is visible between the searchlight guard and the commander's cupola.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48.

From this angle, the M48A5 can be difficult to discern from the M60, but the commander's cupola shape and number of return rollers can help our identification. The armor framing along the tops of the exhaust louvres and armored boxes around the taillights that first appeared on the M48A3 (Mod B) are visible in this rear view, and the raised position of the infantry telephone can be contrasted with this image. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

This M48A5 is sporting the Israeli-designed low-silhouette commander's cupola, and the stark contrast between the two designs is apparent when this vehicle is compared with the tank above. The bore evacuator of the 105mm gun M68 is visible, as is the right-hand "eyeball" of the coincidence rangefinder near the center of the turret. The taller box just behind the long fender stowage box is an engine air cleaner housing. The xenon searchlight is not plugged in to its power receptacle on the turret roof. A .50cal machine gun is mounted on the commander's cupola; the low-profile cupola usually sported a 7.62mm M60D machine gun.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

The engine intake grille doors are open on this vehicle, and the commander's cupola hatch arms can be seen as well.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 at the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum.

The loader was provided with two mounts for his M60D machine gun, and both are visible in this image. The power receptacle for the tank's searchlight can also be seen in front of the TC's cupola.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48.

A closer look at the low-silhouette commander's cupola is provided here. The positioning of the three periscopes in the cupola housing can be seen in front and to the sides of the hatch door, and the details of the machine gun mount can be gleaned as well. The springs of the loader's hatch door are in the background. (Photo by Richard S. Eshleman.)

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

This tank has also been fitted with the M48A5PI features, including the increased ammunition stowage. Nine rounds were stowed in the left side of the turret bustle behind the loader.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

In front of the loader's position, to the left of the main gun, is a nineteen-round ready rack. This tank is fitted out with replica HEAT and sabot ammunition.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

Above the 105mm ready rack is the coaxial machine gun ready ammunition box, which could hold 2200 rounds. The feed chute can be seen towards the front of the box, and the cradle for the coaxial machine gun is visible to the right of the picture.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

An overview of the driver's position is seen here. He used the black steering wheel to control direction, and the brake and accelerator pedals are below the wheel to the left and right, respectively. The red bottles are fire extinguishers, and the green tube to the front of the driving compartment is the crew heater. The lever to the driver's left in front of the fire extinguisher bottles is the purge pump, and the pump handle to the right of the driver's seat is the turret seal pump. The transmission shifting control lever is marked for park, neutral, and low, high, and reverse ranges. Between the accelerator pedal and the transmission shifting control lever is the throttle lock lever.

When in reverse, turning the steering wheel to the right caused the vehicle's rear to swing to the left, and vice-versa. When in neutral, the tank would pivot to the right or left by turning the wheel in the desired direction.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The left side of the driver's compartment is highlighted here. The dimmer switch is labeled, and the red fire extinguisher control handle can be seen towards the vehicle's front. Twelve main gun rounds were stowed in the green tubes behind the fire extinguisher bottles, and a nine-round rack was placed on the right side of the driver's compartment.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The right side of the tank commander's position is shown here. His control handle allowed him to operate the turret and weapons, and the green boxes are the vehicle's intercom controls.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The eyepiece for the M17B1C rangefinder is found in the forward area of the commander's station. Just below the eyepiece is the occluder knob, and the large black knob below and to the right is the ranging knob. The halving knob is located just above the ranging knob, and above and to the right is the filter lever. The red knob above the eyepiece is the ICS knob, and the range scale window can just be seen to the right of the ICS knob. Two of the three periscopes in the TC's cupola are visible in this shot.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

Above the main gun is positioned the instrument light panel for the rangefinder. The farthest-left knob dimmed or brightened the range scale, the knob to its right was for dimming or brightening the reticle, and the switch toggled the coincidence and auxiliary gunsights. The next knob to the right is the vertical adjustment knob, and the final knob in the picture is the horizontal adjustment knob. The shaft going forward from the bottom of the rangefinder is the ballistics drive link assembly, part of the ballistic drive that attached the gun mount elevation system, gunner's sight, commander's telescope, and ballistic computer.

Home       Vehicle list       Top





105mm Gun Tank M48A5 Patton 48 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The gunner's controls are shown here. Powered traverse and elevation were accomplished by the control handles in the center of the picture. The black manual elevating handle is located behind the control handles, and the red button on this handle is the gun firing button. The white handle above the control handles was for hand traversing the turret. The red handle on the left side of the picture was for manually firing the main gun. From left to right, the selector switchbox to the front of the tank activated the coaxial machine gun, the main gun, and turret power. Just below the selector switchbox is the gunner's relay box, and the superelevation actuator is just to the switchbox's right. The gauge behind the gunner's control assembly showed the acculumator pressure. The device to the right of the picture with knobs and dials is the M13B1C ballistic computer, and the gunner's dial-like azimuth indicator is just beyond this. A green intercom control box is below the azimuth indicator. The container below the gunner's control assembly is an oil reservoir.

Home       Vehicle list       Top


Last updated 4 Dec 2013.
Questions? Comments? Corrections? Email me
© Copyright 2001-13 Chris Conners