Medium Tank M3 Lee in Camp Polk, Louisiana.

The riveted construction of the medium tank M3 is obvious here. This vehicle is not fitted with stabilization since it lacks counterweights on the 37mm or short 75mm M2 guns. The machine gun in the commander's cupola is present in its right aperture, and one of the driver's hull machine guns has been retained. Track grousers are stored in the box below the driver's hatch, and the tank's siren is positioned below the 75mm gun. Here the crew, Cpl. Larry Corletti, Pvt. Murril Chapman, and Pvt. Louis Robles, practice dismounting from a disabled vehicle. (Picture taken 12 Feb 1943 by Sgt. Calvano; available from the U.S. Army Center of Military History.)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

The asymmetric design of the tank is highlighted in this top view. A towing cable and tools are stowed on the rear deck, and the filler covers for the four fuel tanks can be seen on each side of the engine air intake grille. (Picture from TM 9-750 Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2.)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

This early-production tank is fitted with pepperpot-style exhaust mufflers in contrast to the vehicles below. (Picture from TM 9-750 Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2.)

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the US Army Ordnance Museum.

This tank has the later air cleaner and exhaust system. The rectangular exhaust pipes are now in the center, with the engine's air cleaners in each upper corner. Engine access was provided by the double doors, and the hole in the rear armor was for the engine hand crank. Taillight groups can be seen above the fenders. A pistol port is visible on the superstructure's right side, and an antenna mount is mounted on the opposite side of the superstructure.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The air cleaners were vulnerable to damage from enemy fire, so extra protection was added around them.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

A close-up of the twin exhaust tips is shown here.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

A cross-sectional view of the tank is provided in this image. This tank also has the early exhaust and air cleaner setup. (Picture from TM 9-750 Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2.)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

The location of the tank's armament and ammunition stowage is sketched here. The key for the figure is as follows: "1. Driver's seat. 2. Radio operator's seat. 3. 75-mm gunner's seat. 4. 37-mm gunner's seat. 5. 37-mm loader's seat. 6. Tank commander's seat. 8. Cal. .30 machine gun. 9. Cal. .30 machine gun. 10. 37-mm gun. 11. 75-mm gun. 12. 2 cal. .30 machine guns. 13. Protectoscopes. 14. 51 rounds 37-mm ammunition carried in turret. 15. 13 rounds 37-mm ammunition. 16. 11 rounds 37-mm ammunition. 17. 42 rounds 37-mm ammunition. 18. Ten 100-round belts cal. .30 ammunition. 19. 20 rounds 37-mm ammunition. 20. Fourteen 250-round belts containing 225 rounds cal. .30 ammunition. 21. Two 250-round belts containing 225 rounds cal. .30 ammunition. 22. Twenty-five 100-round belts cal. .30 ammunition. 23. 41 rounds 75-mm ammunition; six 100-round belts cal. .30 ammunition. 24. 42 rounds 37-mm ammunition. 25. Submachine gun. 26. Submachine gun. Carried in tank but not shown on drawing are 9 rounds 75 mm ammunition carried in cartons and twenty-four 50-round clips cal. .45 ammunition." (Picture from TM 9-750 Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2.)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

Details of the mounting of the twin hull machine guns are shown in this image. (Picture from TM 9-750 Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2.)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The US version of the M3 kept the radio in the hull and featured a large machine gun cupola for the tank commander. The turret consequently had a short overhang, and the TC's cupola is very prominent. In this image, we are looking at the rear of the turret, and the cupola is rotated to almost 9 o'clock. A vision slot is open on the side of the cupola, and a ventilator is visible beside the cupola.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The front of the TC's cupola is shown here. The aperture for the .30cal machine gun is on the commander's right side, and a protectoscope was housed in the opposite opening. Below, the opening for the 37mm gunner's periscope M2 can be seen on the turret front.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

This is a later-production vehicle, as indicated by the ventilators and the lack of side hull doors. The pistol ports and roof hatch over the 75mm gun sponson were retained, however. A stowage box is mounted on the rear deck.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The suspension on the M3 was based on that of the medium tank M2. This vehicle is not fitted with the later, heavy-duty volute springs that necessitated moving the track return roller to the rear of the assembly.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The different turret on this vehicle marks it as a British Grant I. The British did not use the turret machine gun cupola and placed a radio in the bustle of the turret of the Grant. The British turret was lower and wider as a consequence. This vehicle retains the hull side doors, but the hull machine gun ports have been plugged.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The profile view of the British turret shows the lengthened radio bustle at the rear.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

Looking through the open starboard side door, the breech of the 75mm gun and the 75mm gunner's seat is visible. The driver's black padded seat is beyond the 75mm gunner's seat, and the 37mm turret shield is to the 75mm gunner's left rear.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

A second view of the 75mm gun, including the gunner's periscope M1, is shown here. The piston for the gyrostabilizer is mounted to the right of the 75mm gun, but the rest of the equipment is missing.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

The short 75mm gun M2 is shown here with the parts of the gun mount labeled. (Picture from FM 23-95 75-mm Tank Gun M2 (Mounted in Medium Tank M3).)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

The various components of the 75 mm gun stabilizer are outlined here. (Picture from TM 9-750 Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2.)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee at the US Army Ordnance Museum.

This tank is fitted with gun stabilizers. The cylindrical counterweight is mounted under the 37mm gun, and the short barrel of the 75mm gun M2 has a counterweight fitted around it.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The interior of the tank behind the 75mm gunner is shown here. The engine propeller shaft runs beneath the turret, and an oil cooler and oil tank are attached to the bulkhead. The two gauges facing us above the propeller shaft are fuel gauges, and the red handles are for discharging the carbon dioxide cylinder fire extinguishers. The red fire extinguisher cylinders themselves can be seen under the turret basket.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

Looking beyond the 75mm gun, we can see the driver's controls and instrument panel. The steering levers are in front of his seat, and the white gear shift lever is to his right. The handwheel on the right of the image is for traversing the 75mm gun, and this handwheel also contained the solenoid firing button. The riveted construction of the vehicle is evident on the inside as well, and the rivets had the unfortunate tendency to break apart when hit and ricochet around the cramped interior of the vehicle.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

This image is looking into the 37mm turret from the port hull side door. The tank commander's seat is at the top right corner of the picture, the 37mm loader's seat is directly across the turret, the rear of the 37mm gunner's seat can be glimpsed to the left of the frame, and 37mm ammunition racks line the turret walls.

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

The turret crew's positions relative to each other can be better seen here. The gunner's elevation handwheel has a black handle and is positioned paralled to the 37mm gun, and the black gyrostabilizer control unit can be seen across the turret near the turret ring.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

The parts of the stabilizer for the 37 mm gun are detailed here. (Picture from TM 9-750 Medium Tanks M3, M3A1, and M3A2.)

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

The opposite side of the turret is shown here. The cables hanging down in this image can be seen in the foreground of the picture above. (Picture from FM 23-81 37-mm Gun, Tank, M6 (Mounted in Tanks).)

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Cruiser Tank Grant I at the Virginia Museum of Military Vehicles.

Details of the commander's hatch are shown here. A rotatable periscope mount is allowing light through.

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Medium Tank M3 Lee.

The tank's auxiliary generator, the Homelite heater-generator HRH-28, was mounted in the left rear corner of the fighting compartment. It supplied 1500 watts, 30 volts DC for charging the tank's batteries; and a heater element preheated the main engine as well as provided heat for the crew. The Homelite HR-28 electrical generator was driven by a small 3400-3600 rpm, 2-cycle, single-cylinder Homelite HR gasoline engine. (Picture from TM 9-1752 Ordnance Maintenance--Auxiliary Generator (Homelite Model HRH-28) for Medium Tanks M3.)

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Medium Tank M3A1 Lee at the US Army Ordnance Museum.

This cast, smooth-lined M3A1 is armed with the short-barreled 75mm gun M2, and since neither it nor the 37mm guns are fitted with counterweights, this tank also lacks stabilization. The holes can be seen for the hull-mounted machine guns. This tank also has the early suspension bogies which have the return roller on top of the brace. The aperture to the left of the 37mm gun was for the gunner's periscope. The machine gun in the cupola emerged from the right opening; the left was for a vision slot. There is a ventilator above the pistol port in the front of the hull, and there are antenna mounts behind the turret and behind the front hull pistol port. This tank is wearing the T48 rubber chevron tracks.

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Medium Tank M3A2 Lee.

The M3A2 was the first of the series to feature a welded hull. The sharp lines and lack of rivetting are obvious when compared with the tanks above. (Picture from Tank Data, vol. 2.)

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Medium Tank M3A5 Lee.

Most of the identifying features for M3A5 are on the rear of the vehicle, since the major difference between M3A5 and M3 is that the former is powered by twin diesel engines rather than the radial gasoline engine. This tank is not fitted with stabilization since it lacks counterweights under the 37mm gun and around the end of the short 75mm gun M2's barrel. It also is running on the T49 parallel bar steel tracks. (Picture from Development of Armored Vehicles, volume 1: Tanks.)

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Medium Tank M3A5 Lee.

This is a 3/4 front view of the GM 6046 engine. The power from each engine was sent through its drive shaft and gear to a common driven gear which in turn drove the propellor shaft. The individual engines were designated model 671LA24M (right-side engine) and 671LC24M (left-side engine). The engine weight as installed was 4855lb (2202kg). (Picture from TM 9-1750G Ordnance Maintenance--General Motors Twin Diesel 6-71 Power Plant for Medium Tanks M3A3, M3A5, and M4A2.)

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Medium Tank M3A5 Lee.

The legend for this cross-sectional view is as follows: 1. Oil cooler adapter. 2. Oil cooler. 3. Blower housing. 4. Blower rotors. 5. Air cleaner. 6. Secondary fuel filter. 7. Camshaft. 8. Rocker arm. 9. Injector. 10. Injector control rack tube lever. 11. Water outlet manifold. 12. Exhaust manifold. 13. Balancer shaft. 14. Valve rocker cover. 15. Push rod. 16. Section of piston and connecting rod. 17. Air box. 18. Solenoid air inlet control. 19. Air inlet housing. 20. Connecting rod bearing shell. 21. Crankshaft. 22. Main bearing shell. 23. Lubricating oil pump assembly. 24. Lubricating oil pump driven gear. 25. Air heater. 26. Air heater fuel pipe. 27. Clutch shift levers. (Picture from TM 9-1750G Ordnance Maintenance--General Motors Twin Diesel 6-71 Power Plant for Medium Tanks M3A3, M3A5, and M4A2.)

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Medium Tank M3A5 Lee.

The different internal arrangement necessitated by the twin diesel engines can be gleaned when this image is compared with the cross-section of the M3 above. (Picture from Tank Data, vol. 2.)

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Medium Tank M3A3 Lee.

M3A3 was essentially an M3A5 with a welded rather than riveted hull. The sharp lines on the hull of this tank indicates that it has been welded rather than cast. (Picture from Development of Armored Vehicles, volume 1: Tanks.)

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Medium Tank M3A4 Lee.

The large Chrysler multibank engine installed in M3A4 necessitated a longer hull to fit in the tank. The distance between the bogies was also therefore increased, and the rear deck roof and engine compartment floor had bulges to accomodate the A57 engine. (Picture from Development of Armored Vehicles, volume 1: Tanks.)

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Medium Tank M3A4 Lee.

The legend for this cross-sectional view is as follows: A. Tube, water pump air relief (engine no. 1 to no. 2). B. Coil, ignition, assembly (no. 1 engine). C. Cleaner, air, crankcase ventilator, assembly. D. Shaft, drive, tachometer. E. Pump, water, assembly (no. 1 to no. 5 engine). F. Tube, water pump air relief (no. 1 engine). G. Filter, oil (absorption type). H. Coil, igntion (no. 5 engine). I. Pipe, exhaust (nos. 4 and 5 engines). J. Tube, fuel pump to branch connection, assembly (for nos. 4 and 5 carburetors). K. Connection, water pump air relief tube. L. Pump, water, assembly (no. 5 engine). M. Distributor, ignition, assembly (no. 5 engine). N. Tube, water pump air relief (no. 4 to no. 5 engine). O. Tube, fuel pump to no. 1 carburetor, assembly. P. Plate, serial number, engine. Q. Pump, fuel, assembly. R. Coil, ignition, assembly (no. 4 engine). S. Support, engine, rear. T. Pump, water, assembly (no. 4 engine). U. Tube, radiator outlet, assemblt (nos. 4 and 5 engines). V. Distributor, ignition, assembly (no. 4 engine). W. Pan, oil. X. Plug, drain, oil pan. Y. Tube, fuel pump to branch connection, assembly (for nos. 2 and 3 carburetors). Z. Distributor, ignition, assembly (no. 3 engine). AA. Pump, water, assembly (no. 3 engine). BB. Tube, radiator outlet, assembly (nos. 2 and 3 engines). CC. Coil, ignition, assembly (no. 3 engine). DD. Cock, drain, cylinder water jacket, assembly. EE. Distributor, ignition, assembly (no. 2 engine). FF. Tube, water pump air relief (no. 2 to no. 3 engine). GG. Pump, water, assembly (no. 2 engine). HH. Coil, ignition, assembly (no. 2 engine). II. Distributor, ignition, assembly (no. 1 engine). JJ. Generator, assembly. KK. Pipe, exhaust (nos. 1, 2, and 3 engines). (Picture from TM 9-1750F Ordnance Maintenance--Power Unit for Medium Tanks M3A4 and M4A4.)

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Last updated 23 Apr 2014.

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