Half-track Personnel Carrier M5.

The half-track M5 was very similar to the M3, but the mechanicals and armor construction were different, with International Harvester vehicles lacking the characteristic screw assembly of the hace-hardened half-tracks. One can make out that the mount for the shutter in the folding armored window shield is attached on the inside of the window when it is raised, and outside when it is folded down. Half-tracks manufactured by Diamond T, Autocar, and White had the shutter attached on the opposite side. (Picture from TM 9-707 Basic Half-Track Vehicles (IHC).)

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Half-track Personnel Carrier M5 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

Compared to those on half-tracks produced by White, Autocar, and Diamond T, the fenders on this M5 have a thin side view. Like all M5s, this vehicle is fitted with the small, demountable headlights. The headlight brush guard design was also differed on IHC half-tracks.

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Half-track Personnel Carrier M5 belonging to the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The rounded rear corners and smooth passenger compartment exterior are hallmarks of IHC half-tracks. Note also the protruding rear bumpers and the way that the rear armor steps inward from the upper armor down to the bumper frame.

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Half-track Personnel Carrier M5.

The internal layout of the M5 was essentially the same as that of the half-track M3. The machine gun mount can be seen near the front, behind the three front seats; the fuel tanks are near the cab; and seating and stowage are towards the rear. (Picture from TM 9-707 Basic Half-Track Vehicles (IHC).)

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Last updated 1 Sep 2015.
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© Copyright 2006-15 Chris Conners